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Dennis Windego

Dennis Windego is from the traditional lands of the Anishinabeg community of Nigigoonsiminikaaning First Nation in northwestern Ontario.  His Anishinabeg name is Zoongwebines, and he is a member of the Lynx clan.  Dennis follows the teachings of his late father which guides his decolonizing approach to mental health, addictions, grief, and healing of trauma.  He holds an MSW from Laurentian University. He also graduated from the community based, BSW (Hons) program through Seven Generations and Carleton University.

He facilitates and provides psychotherapy in the areas of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorders and Complex Trauma.  Dennis has been providing one on one, family and group sessions for over 30 years within outpatient and land-based treatment settings in First Nations, Metis, and Inuit communities across Canada. He has been a guest speaker at many conferences such as the Annual Dialogue for Life Conference in Montreal, and other healing gatherings involving the judicial, education and health care systems. Dennis works as a psychotherapist with the Cree Board of Health and Social Services of James Bay (CBHSSJB) in Northern Quebec offering, individual, family and group therapy.  Most recently, Dennis has provided workshops, in addition to training on Land-based Healing for Complex Trauma for Grandmother’s Voice in both face-to-face and online modes.  Dennis applies a decolonizing approach steeped in Anishinabeg culture, ceremonies, and psychotherapy for the treatment of trauma, addictions, grief, abandonment, neglect, violence, residential schools, and childhood trauma.  His approach resonates with Indigenous culture, teachings, and ceremonies. 

Dennis develops and facilitates community-centered, land-based, culturally relevant programs which builds on existing programs and services within communities and organizations. He is a Coordinator with the Focusing Institute (New York, NY) and offers using Indigenous Methods for Focusing-Oriented Therapy and Complex Trauma Program- a one-year program for psychologists, counsellors, social workers, elders, traditional healers, and paraprofessionals who work in the field of trauma and addictions with Indigenous peoples and communities affected by colonialism.

He is a former student of St. Margaret’s Indian Residential School in Fort Francis, Ontario. Through his own personal healing journey, coupled with his academic training, he brings his experience and knowledge to assist other survivors in healing of direct and intergenerational trauma.  He lives the lifelong wisdom of his late mother’s teaching, “don’t forget who you are and where you come from”.